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Frequent exposure to secondhand smoke raises chances of fatal artery disease: research

People who are frequently exposed to secondhand smoke are 2.35 times more likely to die from large artery disease than those who are hardly exposed to passive smoking, a Japanese research team has found.

This is reportedly the first time that researchers have clarified the causal relationship between secondhand smoke and large artery illnesses. The team led by University of Tsukuba researchers has announced the finding in a U.S. science journal.

From 1988 to 1990, the team interviewed 48,677 people across the country who were then aged between 40 and 79 about their smoking habits and exposure to secondhand smoke, and conducted a follow-up study on them over the next 16 years on average.

Among these people, 141 have died of aortic dissection, in which a large artery suddenly ruptures, or aortic aneurysm, when part of a large artery swells and ruptures.

These subjects were divided into three groups depending on the frequency of being exposed to secondhand smoke. The team then found those who are frequently exposed to secondhand smoke -- for at least two hours every day at home or almost every day at workplaces or restaurants -- are at 2.35 times greater risk of dying from large artery disease than those exposed to little secondhand smoke.

Those who are sometimes exposed to passive smoking are at not much greater risk of dying from such illnesses than those who are hardly exposed to secondhand smoke, the research shows.

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