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Western Japan braces for 2 typhoons this week

This screenshot of the Japan Meteorological Agency website shows the expected direction of Typhoon Soulik in the coming days.

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- Two typhoons are approaching western Japan, including areas already battered by torrential rain and flooding last month, with the weather agency warning of heavy downpours, strong winds and high waves toward the weekend.

This screenshot of the Japan Meteorological Agency website shows the expected direction of Typhoon Cimaron in the coming days.

Typhoon Soulik, maintaining its strength and packing gusts of up to 216 kilometers per hour, is projected to approach the Amami island chain and the southern part of Kyushu, one of Japan's four main islands, from later Tuesday to early Wednesday.

As of 3 p.m. Tuesday, it was traveling northwest in the Pacific Ocean some 150 km east of Amami Oshima island at a speed of 25 kph with an atmospheric pressure of 950 hectopascals at its center.

The Japan Meteorological Agency forecasts that the typhoon is unlikely to make landfall on Kyushu, moving instead across the sea to its west, but stormy weather is expected in the region.

The southern Kyushu region is expected to receive the largest rainfall of up to 400 millimeters by Wednesday noon, followed by 300 mm in the Amami region and 250 mm in the Shikoku region. Heavy rain is also expected in the Tokai and Kinki regions.

Strong winds of up to 216 kph are expected in the Amami region through Wednesday, while waves measuring up to 11 meters are expected in the southern Kyushu and Amami regions, according to the agency.

Typhoon Cimaron, currently located far south of Tokyo, is projected to approach western Japan on Friday and make landfall. The typhoon is packing gusts of up to 180 kph, and the weather agency expects it to strengthen a bit while moving toward the Japanese archipelago.

As of 3 p.m. Tuesday, the typhoon was moving northwest at 30 kph with an atmospheric pressure of 970 hectopascals at its center.

In July, more than 220 people died as heavy rains hit western Japan, triggering massive flooding and mudslides. The prefectures of Hiroshima, Okayama and Ehime were hit the hardest.

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